Possum Living

Previously on Herban Cowgirl Adventures

(The title of this post should be read in the clipped British accent of Giles from “Buffy the Vampire Slayer.”)

SO much happening here at the Green Goddess Gardens lately.  I just haven’t felt like actually writing about it.  So I’ll do a quick list.

1.  Our family bought a car.  After being without one for over 2 years.  And there was much rejoicing.

Tinted windows so we can pick our noses at red lights.

Tinted windows so we can pick our noses at red lights.

2.  I started running.  Barefoot.

So. Much. Fun.

So. Much. Fun.

3.  My Uncle Billy died.

Little Boy kept our spirits up in the hospital as family sat with Uncle Billy in his last days.  We will miss him.

Little Boy kept our spirits up in the hospital as family sat with Uncle Billy in his last days. We will miss him.

4.  We had the flu for 2 weeks.

We took lots of naps.

We took lots of naps.

5.  The Herban Cowboy built a fence for the chicken yard out of old pallets.

Ooo so fancy!

Ooo so fancy!

6.  One of our new chickens got sick and died.

The new girls.  Lucy is the redhead.  Ethel is the recently deceased.  RIP sweet girl.

The new girls. Lucy is the redhead. Ethel is the recently deceased. RIP sweet girl.

7.  We cut down and chopped up 4 trees in our backyard.

"He's a lumberjack and he's okay..."

“He’s a lumberjack and he’s okay…”

8.  I read “Animal, Vegetable, Miracle” and can’t stop thinking about fresh, local food.

Wild onions found while foraging.  Dirty and stinky and yummy!

Wild onions found while foraging. Dirty and stinky and yummy!

9.  I knit the Herban Cowboy a Doctor Who scarf for his birthday.

Replica of the 4th Doctor's scarf from the episode "The Ark in Space."  Because that's how we nerd.

Replica of the 4th Doctor’s scarf from the episode “The Ark in Space.” Because that’s how we nerd.

10. We got a new (to us) computer, compliments of one of my beautiful aunts.

So big and shiny.

So big and shiny.

11.  I got back on a horse for the first time in 6 years.

You will never be as happy as I am in this picture.

You will never be as happy as I am in this picture.

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Categories: Cowgirl's Livestock, Fabulous Foraging, Green Goddess Garden, Just For Fun, Kitchen Witchery, Possum Living, Stitchin' Bitchin', Telling Stories, The Homestead, To DIY For | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New YouTube Channel

Learning new skills.  It’s a big day.

I finally figured out how to make myself a YouTube channel.  I’ve been wanting to do videos for the blog, cooking, DIY, gardening, chickens, etc, etc.  But I’m a middle aged woman who didn’t even know how to turn on a computer until college.  Gen Y I am not.

And because I am technologically impaired, I still don’t know how to upload playable videos from my camera.  My computer can’t read them for some reason, and I can’t figure out what software to download to make it happen.  I have a computer geek friend visiting next weekend, perhaps if I ply her with homemade bread and garden vegetables she’ll drop the tech on me.  In the meantime, I used Little Boy’s camera.  That’s right.  Don’t look at me like that, it was easier okay?

The video and audio are fuzzier than a broody chicken’s butt, but I consider these videos successes.  In that I was actually able to figure out how this shit worked.

Here’s the chicken video….

 

 

And here are the garden videos.  Part 1……

 

 

And Part 2…..

 

 

Now all I can think about are what videos I want to make.

 

Categories: Cowgirl's Livestock, Green Goddess Garden, Just For Fun, Possum Living, The Homestead | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mulberry Jelly

Late one summer at my grandparents’ house, one of their neighbors dropped by with a giant brown grocery bag full of scuppernongs (those are wild, tough-skinned, sweet white grapes, for any Yankees reading this — haha).  My MaMa looked at the heavy bag on her kitchen table and said, “Well.  Let’s make some jelly!”  We gathered supplies, boiled grapes, squeezed the pulp through cheesecloth to strain out the skins and seeds, added pectin and sugar, and poured it off into little jars.  It was the best grape jelly ever.

My MaMa always seemed to have homemade jelly or preserves on the table.  Apple or plum were the usual jelly choices, and fig or peach were the fabulously chunky preserves.

Ever since I began foraging for wild food (several years ago), I’ve wanted to make jelly.  I keep telling myself “This is the year I’m gonna DO it!”  And then I don’t gather enough, or I’m missing a crucial ingredient or piece of equipment, or I totally miss gathering what’s in season until it’s over.

Well folks, (*trumpet flourish*) this is the year I finally did it.  Yay me!

Last weekend’s mulberry picking excursion didn’t yield enough berries for jelly.  So I froze those, and Saturday we went to shake the trees again.  We gathered all we could reach, and headed back home.

Little Boy shows off his treasure.

Yesterday I gathered all my equipment and ingredients.  I watched a buttload of YouTube videos to help get the process straight in my head.   This one most succinctly explained the water bath canning process and the equipment needed:

I found a few mulberry jelly videos, but this black raspberry one was the one I ended up lifting the most from:

The one piece of equipment I lack is a jar rack for the water bath.  I’d read that you don’t really need one, so I looked up a few ways to improvise.  This video was helpful, and I adore redberrychick’s DIY style, as well as that redneck accent.  Adorable!  I want to hang out on the porch and drink wine with her:

I tried the ring thing, but I don’t have twisty ties and the jars kept falling over.  I ended up going with the folded up towel, but that ended up being wobbly and weird.  I’m getting a jar rack for next time.

Some observations of note from my jelly making process:

1.  I didn’t have cheesecloth, so instead of sending my Herban Cowboy out for some, I used a clean white cloth diaper (that had never been used for doodie duty) to strain it.  It worked pretty well, but I think the cheesecloth would be better for straining fruit pulp.  Next time.

2.  Eleven cups of mulberries only yielded 2 cups of juice.  This totally bummed my jelly high.  I had to make a half batch.

3.  I boiled my jelly too long and ended up reducing it, resulting in a VERY sticky and thick syrup.  We’ll see how this affects the final product.

4.  Cleanup sucks.  The bad news is that mulberry pulp gets everywhere and stains everything.  The good news is that it’s a beautiful shade of purple.

All those years of planning and procrastinating, the money spent on equipment, all the time spent, the cleanup work and a learning curve that encompasses stains and burns  — and I made three jars of jelly.

Three.

I should be crying in frustration, but instead I am SO excited.  The money’s already spent, now I know what to do, the jars are reusable, foraged fruit is free, I’ll be faster next time, what can I make next, somebody stop me!

Maybe I should wait until I taste the jelly before I get TOO excited.  I gave one jar to D, who had driven us all around Chatham County searching for fruiting trees.  The other two sit, with their tightly sealed lids, on my counter.  I’m supposed to wait at least 24 hours before I open one.  We’ll see if I can wait that long………

Mmmmm.

 

Categories: Fabulous Foraging, Kitchen Witchery, Possum Living, The Homestead, To DIY For | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Breakfast Math

I always estimate the cost of meals in my head.  This morning I’m actually doing the math.

Zucchini in a raised bed made from an old tire.

The Herban Cowboy made a vegetable and cheese omelet with strawberry slices on the side.  I had mine with hot sauce and plain yogurt on top.

Ingredients:

The food for this meal came from our backyard garden and chickens, as well as the local organic grocery store the Herban Cowboy works for.  He gets a discount on food, and often brings home free items such as outdated dairy and slightly blemished produce (what we don’t want, we feed to the chickens).

Olive Oil (from Brighter Day, $7.50 for 24 oz — 15 cents per tablespoon)

Eggs (from our backyard flock, factoring in cost of chicken feed — 15 cents per egg)

Red Bell Pepper (free because of black spot, which we cut off)

Zucchini (from garden seed — 2 cents per squash)

Cheddar Cheese (on sale at Piggly Wiggly — $2.99 per lb — 18 cents per oz)

Milk (from Brighter Day $3.00 per half gallon — 2 cents per tablespoon)

Parsley, Basil, Thyme (from garden seed — Cost is negligible)

Salt and pepper (from Brighter Day, cost negligible)

 

At least 20 eggs per week! Go girls!

Coat the iron skillet with 3 tablespoons of olive oil ($0.45).  Saute diced bell pepper ($0.00) and zucchini ($0.02) until soft.  Whisk together 5 eggs ($0.75), 3 tablespoons of milk ($0.06), 2 oz shredded cheddar cheese ($0.30), salt, pepper, and herbs ($0.02).  Pour into pan with sauteed veggies and cook it up!

What does that come to?  $1.60 cents.  Add in a few cents worth of hot sauce, plain yogurt, and sliced strawberries, you’ve got a meal that fed 3 hungry people for about 2 dollars.  And it was SOOOOOOO good.

Of course, I haven’t factored in labor costs involved in preparing the food and washing the dishes.  Fortunately, when we’re all helping gather ingredients and cooking and cleaning up, it’s all fun anyway, so who cares?

 

Categories: Cowgirl's Livestock, Fabulous Foraging, Green Goddess Garden, Possum Living, The Homestead, To DIY For | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Picking Up Chicks

I love chickens.  Love, love, love, LOVE them.

I had never considered having chickens as pets until I did some gardening and landscaping work for a friend (who is a Master Organic Gardener).  She had this mobile, A-frame chicken tractor that she moved around the yard.  The chickens clucked and scratched quietly.  They were adorable and their sweet little noises made me feel so peaceful.

I wasn’t in love yet, but I knew I wanted chickens. So, when my Herban Cowboy and I bought this house almost 3 years ago, we started planning for chickens.  Here’s the Green Goddess Gardens Guide to Getting Chickens.

Otherwise known as "Yard Birds".

Step One (THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT STEP!):  Neighbors.
Talk to them.  I told mine I planned on having a few chickens in the backyard and asked how they felt about it.  No roosters, and the girls would be confined to the yard.  I reassured my neighbors that if they had ANY problems (noise, bugs, smell) that they could contact me and I would take care of it immediately.  Even now, two years later, whenever I’m chit-chatting with folks I make sure I ask if my girls cause them any trouble.  Neighbors can make or break an urban homesteader.  If you don’t think you need to keep civil relationships with your neighbors because you’re within your legal rights to own chickens, I urge you to open another tab right now and google “Roswell Chicken Man.”

Seriously. "Roswell Chicken Man". We'll wait.

Step Two:  Research!
I checked out stacks of library books, watched endless YouTube videos, and browsed several websites and forums.  I researched coop designs and prices, comparing the costs and approaches (pre-fab coop?  DIY?).  I gathered information about where and when to buy chicks (local breeder?  feed & seed store? online hatchery?).  I also had to find out if it was legal for me to keep chickens in my backyard in the city limits (it is).

You can also keep them in your bathtub. But I wouldn't recommend it for long.

Step Three:  Spend money (but not too much!).
We found a pre-fab coop on sale online for a fraction of what it would cost us to gather materials and build it ourselves.  This was awesome, because I LOOOOOVE putting together furniture.  I sat under the carport for two hours, happily sorting hardware and deciphering instructions and sweating.  We found some week old chicks at the local feed & seed store, so we grabbed a handful of baby chickens, an automatic waterer, and a big bag of feed.  We also bought a roll of chicken wire to make a pen to keep them in during the day.  The entire initial set up cost about $250, and most of that was the coop.

Our simple setup.

Step Four:  Protection.
It turns out that almost everything eats chickens.  Feral cats, stray dogs, hawks, possums, raccoons and snakes — and that’s just here in town!  If we lived out in the country, there would also be foxes, bobcats, and scores of other hungry critters.  During the day, chickens need protection from hawks while they’re in their yard.  At night, the coop needs to be a fortress, keeping out persistent varmints, some of whom have hands to open door latches and others that love to dig under fences.  No matter how vigilant you are, you will lose some.  The very first day we had our chicks, a feral cat figured out a way into the pen and stole one of the new chicks.  We didn’t even get a chance to name her.  And just recently, a red tailed hawk found an opening to dive into the chicken yard, killing Little Boy’s favorite hen Betty.  We have since taken greater precautions to protect the other girls, but nature eventually finds a way.  It’s only a matter of time before some other varmint finds a way to get at them that we haven’t thought of.  This is a downside of owning delicious pets, but it is, after all, just the way life is.  Nature is an ever-escalating arms race between predator and prey.

Betty was so sweet.

Step Five:  Flock maintenance.
Chickens are easier and cheaper to keep than cats.  In the morning, I let them out, throw down some feed, and make sure they have water.  In the evening, I close up the coop after they’ve gone in for the night, and I collect the day’s eggs.  That’s it.  Done.  Of course, that’s the bare minimum.  We end up hanging out with “the girls” WAY more than that.  I keep a bowl on the kitchen counter that I toss chicken snacks into.  Leftover scraps from a meal, wilted produce, vegetable/fruit peelings and cuttings, stale bread, stuff that dropped on the floor– we collect it all and then go throw it to the girls, who turn it into fertilizer within 24 hours.  When we’re working in the garden, we let them out of their yard and they go NUTS eating bugs and weeds and scratching around in the compost pile.  Sometimes I sit on the glider bench and knit while the girls give themselves dust baths in the dirt behind me (they’ve dug up huge chicken wallows back there, but they’re so adorable kicking dirt up on themselves that I don’t care).

Gathering for treats.

A Few Words of Caution.
Chickens themselves are irritating varmints.  As much as I love my girls, I have cried and cursed them more than once.  They will escape their enclosure, tear up your garden and landscaping, eat all the grass in your yard, and poop everywhere you walk barefoot.  They can fly higher and run faster than you think (even with their wings clipped).  They have sharp eyesight and hearing and, contrary to popular belief, they are clever and have amazing memories.  They are also annoyingly persistent.  We are always plugging fence holes, repairing netting and fishing line barriers, and trying to figure out how Daphne and Mavis managed to get out into the back lane AGAIN.

Pictured: Little destroyers, scratching up the mulch around the dogwood.

Chicken Zen.
I’ve had chickens for two years now, and I now cannot imagine living without them.  I can’t imagine having a garden without them, either.  Food gardens, composting, and backyard chickens are such a fabulous mini-eco-system.  Our waste, the compost, makes nourishing soil in which we grow our food.  The chickens give us 2-4 eggs a day, aerate the soil, turn the compost pile, and eat the insects that attack the crops.  The garden provides food for us, the chickens, birds, squirrels, butterflies, and bees.  I love being out in my backyard with all the buzzing of insects and clucking of chickens.  It’s peaceful to sit in my little patch of green and unkempt nature, tucked away in this shabby Savannah neighborhood.  Add my knitting bag and a glass of wine and I am one happy Cowgirl.

Sharing the bounty of the garden.

Picking Up Chicks.
Since I’m clearly addicted to having chickens, AND we’re down to 4 chickens from our original 6, AND it’s springtime — we totally got new chickens yesterday.  Two white Ameraucana pullets, bred and raised locally.  They are plain white girls, but their eggs will be bluish green.  They’ve got their grown up feathers, but they’re still making the baby chick peeping and cheeping noises.  It’s disgustingly cute.  We’re keeping them separate from the big girls for a week or so, until everybody gets used to being around each other.  Then we’ll integrate the flock, and in another two months or so, we should start seeing blue eggs show up in the nest boxes.  I’ve been so excited about the new chickens that I keep squealing like a little girl out of nowhere.  It’s REALLY embarrassing, but I can’t seem to stop it.  I blame Minerva Louise and Pearl for being so adorable.

Pearl and Minerva Louise, stinking up the quarantine pen with their cuteness.

 

 

Categories: Cowgirl's Livestock, Green Goddess Garden, Possum Living | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Go Fish

This pose is the Herban Cowboy's version of "Blue Steel".

Went fishing this weekend.  Just me, my Cowboy and our friend D.  Little Boy was at my mother’s house, so we were able to stay down at the dock for hours without him whining about being bored or going home.  He’s not quite old enough to enjoy the Being Still part of fishing.

But I am.  That’s my favorite part.  Just standing in the wind, watching the ripples on the water, the sun rays through the clouds.  Listening to the lapping waves and the seagull cries.  Smelling the marsh and feeling the movement of the tides.

It’s a good thing I like the zen of fishing because I suck at the actual fishing part.

I very rarely catch anything, although to be fair, nobody else down at the dock seems to either.  We probably need to find another fishing spot.  One where people catch things besides crabs and slimy sucker fish.  It’s a good thing I don’t need to live off what I catch.  I might waste away to normal.

Yesterday our friend D joined us, and even though she didn’t catch anything either, it was nice to have an experienced voice coaching us and our puny poles along.  A few changes we need to make in our setup:  bigger poles, stronger lines, better bait.  Maybe I can post a wanted ad on Freecycle for a nice fishing pole or two.  If I find something better for the grownups, then the Little Boy can have one of the wimpy poles.

Next time, bigger poles. I'll get you, my pretties. You can't hide forever. Muahahaha.

To be honest, I don’t know what I’d do if I actually caught a mess of fish.  I’ve never cleaned one in my life.  I’m a little grossed out by the prospect of it, but I think I could do it.  One of my wishes is to be able to eat fish that I caught about once a week.

I think I’m going to bake D a fresh loaf of bread and invite her fishing again.

Categories: Fabulous Foraging, Possum Living | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Homemade Laundry Soap

I just sat here for 15 actual minutes trying to come up with a clever title for this post.  Clearly I have failed, but decided to press on anyway.

Back when the Herban Cowgirls were blogging at “Hex and the City” I did a post about homemade laundry detergent.  <http://herbancowgirls.wordpress.com/2010/05/18/the-neverending-laundry/>  That was nearly two years ago, and I’ve been washing with my homemade soap ever since.  And I have spent less than $10 on ingredients in that time.  You heard me.  Ten.  Dollars.

Today I’m making a fresh batch, and I’m using this recipe from the Simple Dollar:  <http://www.thesimpledollar.com/2008/04/09/making-your-own-laundry-detergent-a-detailed-visual-guide/>  I finally found washing soda in my area, so I’ll be interested to see if I can discern any difference between my old formula and the new recipe.

The cleaning cabinet in my kitchen. Washing soda, borax, and baking soda nestled in between the kitchen towels, cloth napkins, and cleaning rags.

I love my homemade laundry soap.  One batch lasts months, my clothes don’t have an artificial perfume smell, and it costs pennies a load.  I keep the big batch in the bucket I make it in, but I’ve got an old detergent bottle that I pour some into to work from.  It is kind of a pain to pour off more detergent from the giant bucket, but it’s way less of a pain than driving to the store and spending up to $12.99 when the bottle runs dry.

Herban Cowgirl Laundry Wash

Once last summer, my shirts got a bit “pitted out” (South Georgia summer is harsh y’all).  I broke down and bought a bottle of commercial laundry detergent, thinking my clothes just weren’t getting clean enough.  The laundry came out with shirts that smelled like armpits and perfume.  I was so annoyed.  I ended up tossing one shirt as a lost cause, and alternating vinegar and baking soda treatments worked on the rest of them.

In short, I love my homemade laundry soap.  It easy, cheap, and quick to make.  Win.  Win.  WIN.

Categories: Possum Living, The Homestead, To DIY For | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

Going Viral

Rawr Mommy! I'm a vampire! Mommy? Why are you moving so slowly Mommy?

Little Boy picked up a virus a few days ago.  A day of being whiny and watching DVDs in bed, a little runny nose, humidifier in his room, lots of snuggles.  No big deal.

Until it hit my big body.  Now my throat, nose and sinuses hurt, I’m achy all over, swollen glands in my neck, skin hot and cold, coughing and sneezing.  I hate everything.  And of course Little Boy is fine today.  Will the virus run its course in 3 days for me, too?  I doubt it.

As crappy as I feel, I am grateful for my possum living lifestyle on days like today.  I don’t have to dose myself with OTC drugs that mask symptoms, but seem to lengthen the duration of illness.  I don’t have to get dressed up and go to a job, pretending to function all day long.  I don’t have high pressure deadlines to reach.  I always hated that about the world of work.  Even if you’re sick, you have to show up, since the office/store/restaurant only scheduled the bare minimum of people to cover all the work that needs to be done.  If you take a sick day, every one of your co-workers has a shittier day picking up your slack.  And even when you own your own business, you’ve got to show up, since everything grinds to a halt or explodes if you look away for five minutes.

So I’m taking a real sick day.  The kind every person should be entitled to in order to nourish their health.

The view from the glider bench in my Green Goddess Garden.

First of all, I’ve made a little nest in my bed.  Laptop, tissues, linden infusion (yum!), cell phone, book.  Little Boy is watching Dino Dan and drawing.  In a little while, he’ll bring a stack of books and workbooks to do some school while snuggling in bed with Mommy in our jammies.  Whenever I can drag my butt into the kitchen, I’ll start a pot of chicken soup with an organic chicken I got for free because it was freezer burned.  Maybe we’ll sit outside later for some fresh air and sunshine.  Lots of strong herbal infusions, lots of rest, lots of responsibility shirking.

I feel very fortunate today.  My only regret is that I can’t take ibuprofen for my body aches, because it will get rid of my low grade fever, which I’m using to burn the viruses out of my miserable body.

 

Categories: Possum Living, Unschooling, Wise Woman Way | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Coffee Confessions

I love coffee.  Most of my friends love coffee.  A few of them even post coffee love poems and jokes about it on Facebook.  Coffee is full of anti-oxidants, and studies have suggested that moderate amounts can help with everything from diabetes to suicide prevention.  It’s a magic potion that bestows energy and life upon its consumer.  Ambrosia of the gods, if you will.

One of my friends loves coffee so much, she made this her profile picture.

I have romanticized coffee in my mind.  And I still think it’s ambrosia of the gods.  But the key phrase in that last paragraph was “moderate amounts.”  If you know anything about me, it’s that “moderation” is just not my thing.  Here’s how I have allowed coffee to take over my life like an abusive boyfriend….

First thing in the morning, make a pot of coffee.  Three cups at least.  I tell myself I need this much because of all the chores I have to do around the Homestead.  Make food, do laundry, water the garden, rake the chicken yard, sweep/clean the carport, transplant seedlings, wash dishes.  I’m going to need that coffee buzz to get all that done.

Sad, but true.

But before I get started, I’ll just have one cup of that coffee.  Ooo, I can check my email while I’m having my coffee.  Good idea.  Then I’ll get going on the chores.   After my first cup, I’m not quite buzzed enough, so I decide to get a second cup and troll Facebook.  For just a little while.  I should eat something, but the coffee has killed my appetite and even made me slightly nauseous.  Hm.  Well, I’m not going to eat while I feel like this, so I’ll have that third cup of coffee.  And maybe work on one of my writing projects.  In between trips to the bathroom of course.  We’ll leave that detail at that, shall we?

But first I will run to the bathroom.

This is how my morning falls down the rabbit hole of coffee and computer.  By the time I look up, it’s almost lunchtime and I’ve been sitting on the couch for hours, drinking four cups of poop potion and not eating anything nourishing.  Then I feel overwhelmed, the To-Do List only gets half done, I’m tired and nauseated and I feel guilty and stupid for blowing my entire morning.

This scenario happens EVERY MORNING, and is one of my dirty little secrets.

Find the man's face in the beans!

I’ve given up coffee here and there over the years, but I always come back.  It’s so easy to tell myself that I’ll just have the coffee maker at home in case guests come over.  That even if I do make some coffee, I’ll only have one cup.  That I won’t use it as an excuse to sit and waste time.

The bottom line is, drinking coffee is stressing my kidneys & adrenals, wrecking my digestion, wreaking havoc on my hormones, encouraging wastefulness, draining my bank account, and supporting an unsustainable industry.  I’m starting to get the message that maybe I should probably someday kinda sorta …stop drinking coffee.

There I said it.

Put the mug down and back away slowly.

 

Categories: Possum Living, Wise Woman Way | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

Can you still say “Gypsy”?

I want to live in a gypsy caravan.  Little sleeping nook, some comfortable seating, a tiny kitchen and a dirty-hippie composting toilet.  Weather permitting I’d cook outside, poop outside, and even shower outside.  I’d keep some chickens, a little garden, and an apiary for honey.  I’d forage and fish.  In crappy weather we’d hunker down inside, playing games, reading, knitting, writing, making art, etc.

I would need some modern conveniences.  Internet and running water access are mandatory.  A small amount of electricity would be required.  Gotta update my Facebook status.

I’d need some groceries.  Salt, whole wheat flour, milk, cheese, butter, yogurt, and olive oil.

This is what I’m practicing for.

http://tinyhouseblog.com/tiny-house-concept/wandering-book-artists-gypsy-wagon/

I suck at blogging.  That should have been a link.

Categories: Cowgirl's Livestock, Fabulous Foraging, Green Goddess Garden, Just For Fun, Possum Living, Telling Stories, The Homestead, Unschooling | Leave a comment

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